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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm joined by jonathan capehart, and john rosen that will, founder of stop handgun violence. i'll start with you, jonathan capehart. before we discuss the situation, i want the to ask about a joint statement today made by the family of newtown's victims. after thanking people for their kindness and thoughts at this time, they suggested the best way to help on saturday would be to perform an act of charity. i think that's something many people can relate to. and yet there are so many who think this is a time to also think about other collective action, including policy change. >> yes. well, you can understand, if you've met any of the families, the newtown families, you can understand, you know that the pain from a year ago is still very much -- very much present, very much on the surface. and so their desire, one for privacy, and two, for acts of kindness or charity, are understandable. but we also have to understand that there are people out there who have been fighting for gun violence reduction, changes in gun policies that would make it possible for there to be, you know, more safet
this country with honor. >> ron reagan is a political analyst and jonathan capehart is an msnbc contributor. ron, this sort of old republican thing here about making fun of people because they're unemployed, i think of factory towns where the factory closes. and it's very hard to imagine just pulling up stakes and heading to some other part of the world to get a job. but that's what i guess rand paul thinks they ought to do quick as hell. and the idea the unemployed want to be unemployed is crazy because everybody hates being unemployed. everybody i met hated it except for a short time, nobody wants to watch television all day when they could be an active part of society and proud of themselves. >> well, it's another example that the republicans or particular republicans of being just counterfactual on the one hand. there are no studies that indicate that, you know, if you receive unemployment, you then don't want to work. and from a common sense point of view, how do you imagine that somebody who's already earned an inadequate salary is now going to be satisfied earning half of that money
body this morning. you can see the south african flag draped over his coffin. jonathan hunt is here with more. a lot of gestures of reconciliation. >> nelson mandela talked so often about the need for forgiveness, for the south africa as a nation, but he also took many personal individual actions that proved he was going to walk that walk as well as talk the talk. for instance, here, that is his inauguration as president in 1994. he invited three of the white prison guards who had been among those holding him captive for 27 years. then after he was inaugurated, one of the first things he did in 1994 was go and see the widow of this woman. look at this guy. hfvervold. conceived apartheid, yet nelson mandela sat down for tea and doughnuts with that man's widow. the prosecutor who appeales for the death penalty in mandela's 1963 trial, in 1995, nelson mandela invited him to lunch. >> wow. he used sports and sports fans to really unite the country. >> you and i talk about this on foxnews.com last night, shep, when this news was breaking. this picture -- look at this. this is nelson mand
voted for obama care so blame them for your troubles. as jonathan allen writes, if they aren't aware of the law's upside or can't remember it amid the problems with the rollout, democrats will be holding on to a anchor rather than a buoy which leads us back to the presidential pr pitch and peter alexander outside the white house. you just heard the president's speech. do you think the bully pulpit has lost its power at this point? >> reporter: a lot of people who paid attention to the last couple of months for this white house feel they've heard events not too dissimilar to this multiple times. this is the reboot, 3.0. the white house feels strongly this is the time it's going to work. the president made it pretty clear, krystal, you can make fun e
. the on board with smith his daughter amber and her fiance jonathan norton. smith so that daniel shown here on the left and his wife. smith and his family had just spent thanksgiving at his parent's home in oregon. >> he was just taking his son and his daughter back. son back to butte, montana a and daughter back to the idaho where she goes school with her fiance. >>reporter: after dropping them off smith was going back to oregon to pick up his wife and other daughter and 2 younger sons and bring them back to san jose. the search resumes tomorrow st weather permitting. vick lee, abc 7 news. >> well there was a rally outside fundraiser for the sonoma couldn't district attorney with protestors angry over the investigation into the shooting death of a boy by a sheriff's deputy. protest trors demanding an indictment in the case of 15-year-old andy lopez who was carrying a pellet gun that lacked lick an ak 47 when deputy eric shot him on october 22. they put pressure on the district attorney jill ravage to take action. >> let her know that she does not do the necessary things that there's
a couple hours. it is unraveling on its own effects. i was telling jonathan that i think it is not that government is inherently stupid, although that is a debatable point. it is that they do not get the right incentives. the business would be run this way because you would be run out of business immediately. we have put into law perverse incentives. people who had cheap insurance no longer can buy that. it is what they could afford and that is the only way they had it. i was one of them. i used to have family coverage for five people, for $5,000. a $5,000 deductible. in obamacare, you can have a higher detectable and still pay $20,000 because there is a mandate built into it. the problem is the insurance company is never going to offer those policies again because they are told within a year, if you delay it for year, then in a year everyone will be forced to buy the new policies, which are more expensive. let's say you sell bread and you sell for a dollar a loaf, and they say, we're going to force everybody to buy for two dollars a loaf, but you have to continue selling
the police are overreaching. jonathan sill says for this case to progress it has to be the boys knew the person was drunk and that they knew the accident would happen. so there's a standard of proof that is very, very high. it would be very difficult for the state to say one of the boys' conduct actually caused the accident. other thing you're a parent, i thought about, how much responsibility is on the shoulder of the parent who some people if they want to be cynical would say why didn't you teach your kid not to overindulge and underage drink, if we're going to go that route of who's responsible. >> i'm not saying it's an easy case but i don't agree with the analogies the way they were presented. i won't say it's an individual with a gun in his hand. to the extent this driver got out and leaves her the keys, he's handing the gun or it's someone who's intoxicated and now going for a swim in the ocean and you're giving them the bathing suit. you're facilitating. the prosecution is saying you're facilitating the process that puts them on this deadly sbiral. i don't know they'll be suc
african president nelson mandela. jonathan hunt takes a look back at this extraordinary life. >> reporter: when nelson mandela walked free from prison on february 11, 1990, he knew, as did the rest of the world, that white domination in south africa was about to end. he had fought apartheid since 1948, campaigning peacefully at first, then advocating and taking part in violent resistance. in 1964, he was sentenced to life with hard labor and sent to the notorious robin island prison. world wide protests against the apartheid regime quickly gathered pace. ♪ ♪ and nelson mandela became the most famous political prisoner on the planet. within months of his 1990 release, he was holding peace talks with south africa's then president and in april 1994, with apartheid abolished, nelson mandela became president himself after south africa's first all race elections. >> i have fought a very firmly. i have fought very firmly against this. i cherish the idea for south africa where all south africans are equal. >> reporter: nelson mandela served just one five-year term, but remained perhaps the mo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)